Blog

Customer Research

24 May 2018

How to Connect the Dots in a Digital World

Chris Hanson Posted in: Content Strategy, Customer Experience, Customer Research, Demand Generation

Sometimes it can be a challenge to create win-win solutions with your organization and your customers. On one hand, your goal is to increase market share and leads with limited resources. On the other, your customers expect personalized experiences, which requires more time and resources - and that can be costly without the right automation tools.

24 Oct 2017

9 Low-Tech Ways to Prioritize Your Customer Before Your Brand

Megan Jensen Posted in: Customer Experience, Customer Journey, Customer Research, Marketing Strategy

Priorities in business usually revolve around financials and forecasting, resources and revenue, team building and technology. It’s easy to become myopic and lose focus of the most important thing in the world: your customers.

19 Jul 2017

How to Use Research & Personas for Personalized Marketing

Emily Dallaire Posted in: Customer Research, Marketing Strategy, Personalization, Personas & Segmentation

Personalization, by definition, should not be a “one-size-fits-all” effort.

25 Nov 2015

Rules of Thumb: Keeping Your Brand Promise with Digital Experience

Jason Jacobson Posted in: Branding, Customer Research, Digital Experience, Integrated Marketing, Mobile, Social Media, Strategy, Web, Brand, Audience, Message, Targeted Marketing Programs, Technical Strategy

Every strong brand adheres to a promise of quality, service, price or a combination of two. Yes, only a maximum of two.

16 Sep 2015

Sorry, Kids: Your Logo Isn’t Your Brand

Jena LaPlante Posted in: Branding, Creative Strategy, Customer Research, Digital Experience, Graphic Design, Strategy, Brand, Audience, Message, Targeted Marketing Programs

So many clients ask for a logo, and then think, “Great, I’m done! Here is my brand.” Not to be the bearer of bad news, but actually, no. Your logo isn’t your brand. Of course, it’s one aspect of it, but it’s really not the most important part.